Tuesday, July 24, 2007

homesick blues

I was clearing out Tilly’s schoolbag this evening as they have finished school of course and I found a piece of paper. I asked Tilly what it was. I was rather brusque as I thought it was a school letter. She told me the teacher had asked all the children to write a poem about the thing they loved the most in the whole wide world. My daughter looked nervously at the piece of paper. She said the teacher told her that her poem was rubbish and old fashioned because it rhymed and then she ran upstairs crying, leaving me with the tear stained crumpled piece of paper. I unfolded it and began to read and it wasn't very long before I was sobbing too.

My Mummy, by Tilly Super aged seven

The baby he is burping
Her skinny latte she is slurping
With her laptop she is lurking
Watching other people working
Her brain she’s so exerting
We cannot get a word in
The world she is alerting
To the plight that she's been purt in
In London she’d be flirting
Down at the Fox and Firkin
Like Serge Gainsbourg and
Jane Birkin
But now she’s just hair-shirting
And when she looks through the net curtain
One thing is for certain
Inside she is hurtin'
And she is dreaming of The Gherkin


I’m so sorry, I don't think I can write any more tonight, it's late and I’m just too emotional, sob...

37 comments:

Flowerpot said...

Oh sob, Rilly. What a talented girl you have there... I should have a Very Large G&T if I were you.

rilly super said...

oh thankyou flowerpot dear, she is isn't she, although it's as if she was thinking about somebody else's mother entirely wheh she wrote her poem and neither could she think of anything appropriate to rhyme with 'subterreanean' to complete the title of this post so she's not that clever, sigh

Anonymous said...

Oh, that should get your comment numbers up Rilly - as you know, it's worked before for others when writing about their poor put-upon children, personal angst, unhappiness and missing London Life. Or p'raps I'm being just a teensie bit cynical... I'd like to think so.

Anonymous said...

Oh, Rilly ! I am crying too ! This is far better than anything that Mary Ann Bighead's daughters Brainella and Intelligencia could come up with.

And so moving !

Anonymous said...

Your daughter is so bright I feel that she will be badgering you to join the Girl Guides soon. Although they seem to be more worried about safe sex, personal finance and !ke@ flatpack these days than camping it up and standing up to boys..sigh..

Lizzie said...

Anon 3 - what do you mean 'camping it up' por favor? I really don't think that Rilly's clearly gifted daughter should even begin to think of attempting such things. It could further damage her poor mummy's emotional frailties, on or off the top shelf - um - or whatever shelf it is she would like to sit on... sniff.

Lizzie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Sorry, Rilly, that's me deleting - don't quite know what happened.

rilly super said...

anonymous 12.48, thanks for dropping by dear. I'm quite sure you're not cynical at all and I of course would never exploit my grim life for any reason. on the comments front, I value and appreciate each individual comment because it means someone took the time and trouble to read the blog and leave a message, even if in fact one individual comment is all there is, sigh...

anonymous 4.36, dry your eyes dear or you'll set me off again! I did read something about these modern girl guides. There will certainly be some interesting new badges to go for if she wants to join up. some of these skills will surely be of use to her only in the most desperate of circumstances though, I mean assembling flat pack furniture, really...

lizzie, I do hope there is nothing 'top shelf' about this blog, read by all the family as I hope it is!

anyway, Tilly said I should write a poem about the thing I love the most in the world so I'm just trying to find a rhyme for 'my new marble kitchen worktops'. It's not easy you know; no wonder these poets are such troubled souls!

Anonymous said...

By the way, Rilly, don't think we haven't noticed that you were featured on the Guardian's blog guide - spiritual home of conflicted eco city downshifters everywhere.

I am a Guardian reader myself, but sometimes the ridiculous sight of articles by George Monbiot about how flying is killing the planet, jostling for space with an advert for the latest 'Guardian Offer' holiday to Guadelope or Guatamela courtesy of Climate Change Airways is a little too much to bear.

mutterings and meanderings said...

Oh Rilly, what a talented daughter you have - just like her mother!

You must be so proud that she is blossoming despite being stuck in the North and having to talk to Northern children...

Richard Madeley said...

Sorry to be the one to put you straight but it's very derivative of early Ezra Pound.

The Secretary said...

Fabulous darling. I hope that you go and sort out that teacher that can't tell talent when it's staring her in the face - probably came from a state school lovely.

Pig in the Kitchen said...

Clearly following in her Mother's talented footsteps. A real credit to you Rilly.

The thinker said...

Well Really Rilly, how super what a lovely pome. Impressive. Clever child. She must take after you.

I think you should stop the anon e mouse blogs - people should have the courage of their convictions.

PS Do you think the anon comments might have been from that Richard Madely chap firing a few blanks before he found out how it works?

Richard Madeley said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Richard Madeley said...

I never deliberately fire blanks, Thinker, though Judy did make me have a vascectomy live on air in the early 1980s. Luckily the stitches didn't hold.

rilly super said...

M&M, it's been a struggle I must confess, and mainly involves locking the children in a room with nothing but DVDs of 1940's black and white films

Richard, you visiting this blog makes me feel a bit like the chap reaching out to touch the finger of god in the cistine chapel

secretary, I shall be going around to the school later to tell them how to do things properly, don't you worry!

PITK, hello dear and I hope your sun tan is recovering after you lost it during your holiday in England. Tilly is very bright, In fact these stories of youngsters being given enormous advances for unwritten first novels makes me contemplate putting her name to my book, sigh

thinker, I know some people do this, stop anonymous comments I mean, but as they are mostly nice and i am not terribly technically acomplished I shall just have to keep this under review, as they say...

Richard Madeley said...

Bless you, my child.

The English Courtesan said...

Now THAT is some seven year old Rilly and Super you clearly are!

I'm not remotely cynical about Tilly's genius and I can only commend you for raising what will surely be a leading light of the blogosphere in due course.

It is most refreshing to come across a child that knows its Serges and Janes rather than its Nintendo Wees. Make sure you add some wholegrains and sprouts to that black and white film diet! ;-)

Livvy xxx

debio said...

It's good to see that little Tilly is aware of the dramma and angst that goes with creativity....running away in tears is essential as critics are many and varied; although I feel maybe you should guide her as to those she should take seriously, or not...

Mopsa said...

More verses are required. This is just the start. I think 6 lines a day would be good discipline to allow for 2 or 3 rhymes. This week I was discussing the possibilities of producing a haiku all made up of TLAs (3 letter acronyms). What a life we lead.

Rob Clack said...

I hope your extraordinarily gifted child isn't acquiring a ghastly Northumbrian accent at that school. That would just be the end. Hinnie.

Anonymous said...

Rilly, on the Serge Gainsbourg front, a film you would really enjoy is the 'Science of Sleep', starring his daughter Charlotte Gainsbourg. Sorry if I've been banging on about this before. But it does feature Gael Garcia Bernal - although he doesn't really get his kit off in this film, sigh, it is more of a weepy romantic.

Stick 'Rainy Night in Georgia' on the CD next time there is a storm up on the moors, put that film in the DVD and have a box of kleenex at the ready..

Anonymous said...

I'm a sucker for a softly spoken 'ghastly northumbrian accent' Rob. it's beautiful, like the place itself

lady macleod said...

..the ....the Gherkin! Holy Crap! ...sorry, now I'm sobbing... what were you saying about a poem?

Ms Baroque said...

Rilly, sweetie, I think you want to say sistine... "cistine" just reminds me a little too much of "cistern," with all its associations of really good bathroom fittings... possibly a bit emotional on top of the poem and the rest of it?

Speaking of which, that is some child you've got there. Imagine her getting all those rhymes for the Fox & Firkin!

Good luck with your own poem, Rilly; remember, the North has produced many inspiring wordsmiths in its time. (I believe some of them went there on purpose because there was so little else to do!)

ziggi said...

how lovely!
the only notes I have ever received from my daughter say things like:
"I've taken the last tenner / new sweater / shoes / coat / bottle of gin / phone / life, c ya l8er when I need pickin up"

Rob Clack said...

Anonymous 9.56 Sigh, caught out by my desire to be funny. I am old enough to know better.

I, too fell in love with the north-eastern accent when I lived just south of Sunderland for a couple of years.

More recently that was displaced by Kirsty Wark. Think that's how you spell her.

But she has now lost out to Sandrine Voillet...ah, la petite Parisienne!

rilly super said...

Richard dear, I feel like I don't need to go to confession this week now I've cut out the middle man

Livvy, thanks ever so for visiting. I will pass on your kind thoughts to young Tilly. I hope she doesn't become too much of a leading light in the blogosphere though, I've got book sales to think about...

debio, you are quite right about the need to judge whom to take seriously. I just hope she takes me seriously enough to take my advice on who else to take seriously, sigh

Mopsa, as I understand that you work in local government I think you will find haiku a touch limiting as surely you have enough acronyms to re-write the song of hiawatha or perhaps a nordic saga or two...

rob, fortunately we are on the non-blue-facepaint-wearing bank of the Tees here darling, so I just have to protect my little darlings from any 'wetbacks' that cross the river under cover of darkness to be a bad influence on the pronunciation of innocent southern children

anonymous, I haven't seen that yet, although I am a bit of a fan of Mlle Gainsbourg from stuff like Merci la vie and ma femme est une actrice. I will look out for it as I missed it at the cinema

anonymous, thanks for dropping by dear. You are quite right about Northumberland I would love to see more of it, but GNER trains do have such dirty windows and by the time you manage to find a patch you can see through you're in Berwick and you've missed it

lady macleod, your ladyness, lovely to see you. That is a real building,honest I don't make this stuff up you know..

Ms Baroque, I am ever so pleased you've dropped by. Thanks for spotting the tiny little spelling there, I will probably be ex-communicated now, sigh. You are quite right that many great writers have come from the North and I will tell Ian Mcmillan that you're a fan of his..

Ziggi, I think hardship and adversity bring out something in children. If the Bronte sisters had come from Islington you can't help but think that although they would have had a far superior insight into life in the north and all that other stuff they went on about their output would have lacked a certain je ne said quoi and all they'd have in that parsonage would be some text messages and Emily's facebook friends list, which probably would only have had Elizabeth gaskell on it, sigh

Rob, I know what you meant dear. Sunderland eh? Did you know that this weekend it's the sunderland airshow in fact. The planes just fly up and down the coast. Even at 30,000 feet some people are nervous of venturing into the city centre...

anyway, thanks all for visiting and hope everyone has a lovely weekend

Swearing Mother said...

Hey Rilly,

I am now unreasonably annoyed with your daughter's teacher! Your girl is a genius.

No doubt about that.

Mopsa said...

Rilly - nooooooooooooooooooo. Left local govt 8 years ago and will never go back. Here is to independence, a life and rather fewer TLAs

Lord Straf-Bollinger said...

A mother's heart. It's a special kind of heart.

Anonymous said...

Dear Rilly, Would it not be possible for you to offer a weekly 'agony aunt' service ? Linda whatsername in the Guardian is a bit too taken up with life-or-death traumas for me to feel able to bother her. Mariella Frostrup only seems interested in the shagging related 'worries' of young and beautiful people, but a wise owl such as yourself would, I feel sure, offer some useful and homespun advice to the young-at-heart. Any thoughts?

@themill said...

Rilly, your daughter's genius is undoubted, but surely she must be mistaken - one can hardly believe one as refined as your good self would be in possesion of a net curtain?! Would it not cover the new granite window sill and dangle in the Starbucks coffee mug?

Ms Robinson said...

Rilly, Hi I am new to your blog but of course I do know of it and think you are utterly brilliant.

rilly super said...

swearing mother dear, thanks for visiting and I'm so glad you recognised my daughters talents, I just hope she doesn't get dumbed down by the terrible uneducated northerners, sigh

oh dear mopsa, sorry if you took that earlier comment of mine as something of a sleight, *looks a bit sheepish*

lord straf bollinger, ahh, I can see you understand, sigh...

anonymous, I had never thought of doing that kind of thing other than of course in the solace and comfort that I feel I offer to readers through my accounts of my own terrible struggles in the grim,grim north, but if there is something on your mind dear then I'm all ears...

@mill, alas, you have found the flaw in my daughters verse. I suppose we could assume it is simply poetic licence but nevertheless, I will ensure her sleight on my interior design standards is suitably punished.

Ms Robinson, thanks ever so for dropping by me dear. You are very kind and anyone who says nice things like that is certainly welcome any time!